“In such ugly times, the only true protest is beauty."
- Phil Ochs
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But sometimes we get sad about things and we don’t like to tell other people that we are sad about them. We like to keep it a secret. Or sometimes we are sad but we don’t really know we are sad. So we say we aren’t sad. But really we are.

— Mark Haddon, The Curious Incident of the Dog In the Night-Time

(Source: seabois, via sheonlysaid)

archatlas:

A House Apart Ben Marcin

(via likiteesplit)

So this happened…

So this happened…

Isabelle Adjani in The Story of Adele H (1975).

Isabelle Adjani in The Story of Adele H (1975).

(Source: stigmataparty, via miss-laura-bennet)

mothergoddamn:

In June 1943, while pregnant with her first child,  Gene Tierney contracted rubella during her only appearance at the Hollywood Canteen. Her daughter, Daria, was born prematurely in Washington, D.C., weighing only three pounds, two ounces and requiring a total blood transfusion. Because of Tierney’s illness, Daria was also deaf, partially blind with cataracts, and had severe mental retardation.
Tierney’s grief over Daria’s condition led to many years of depression and is believed to have triggered her bipolar disorder. Some time after Daria’s birth, Tierney learned from a fan who approached her for an autograph at a tennis party that the woman had sneaked out of quarantine while sick with rubella to meet Tierney at her only Hollywood Canteen appearance.
In her autobiography, Tierney related that after the woman had recounted her story, she just stared at her silently, then turned and walked away. She wrote, “After that I didn’t care whether ever again I was anyone’s favorite actress.”

mothergoddamn:

In June 1943, while pregnant with her first child,  Gene Tierney contracted rubella during her only appearance at the Hollywood Canteen. Her daughter, Daria, was born prematurely in Washington, D.C., weighing only three pounds, two ounces and requiring a total blood transfusion. Because of Tierney’s illness, Daria was also deaf, partially blind with cataracts, and had severe mental retardation.

Tierney’s grief over Daria’s condition led to many years of depression and is believed to have triggered her bipolar disorder. Some time after Daria’s birth, Tierney learned from a fan who approached her for an autograph at a tennis party that the woman had sneaked out of quarantine while sick with rubella to meet Tierney at her only Hollywood Canteen appearance.

In her autobiography, Tierney related that after the woman had recounted her story, she just stared at her silently, then turned and walked away. She wrote, “After that I didn’t care whether ever again I was anyone’s favorite actress.”

pubertad:

Dr. Hans Killian, Facies Dolorosa, 1935

Originally published in 1935, Dr. Hans Killian created this photographic study of the faces of patients awaiting death for doctors and physicians. This powerful and disturbing document sensitively captures the beauty and fragility of the human condition.

(via familiarhistory)

Malena (2000)

(Source: kimnovaks)

Beautiful sadness is a myth. Sadness turns our features to clay, not porcelain.

David Levithan, Every Day
(via seabois)

(via seabois)

I knew it wasn’t too important, but it made me sad anyway.

J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye  (via yasodhara)

(Source: theburnthatkeepseverything, via retrojapan)

Natalie Portman in Black Swan (2010)

Natalie Portman in Black Swan (2010)

(via thisisthelifenigga)

Her face was sad and lovely with bright things in it, bright eyes and a bright passionate mouth.

F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby (via seabois)

(via chanter-dans-le-jardin)

Hedy Lamarr in Ecstasy (1933).

Hedy Lamarr in Ecstasy (1933).

(via frfastor)

Some people turn sad awfully young. No special reason, it seems, but they seem almost to be born that way. They bruise easier, tire faster, cry quicker, remember longer and, as I say, get sadder younger than anyone else in the world. I know, for I’m one of them.

— Ray Bradbury (via jesuisperdu)

(Source: thechocolatebrigade, via cerebrospinalien)