“In such ugly times, the only true protest is beauty."
- Phil Ochs
Install Theme

The Last Billboard

A 36-foot-long billboard located at the corner of Highland and Baum in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Every month, a different individual is invited to take over the billboard to broadcast personalized messages, which are spelt out using wooden letters that are changed by hand. 

you can follow its tumblr here.

(via bii)

Words reduce reality to something the human mind can grasp, which isn’t very much. Language consists of five basic sounds produced by the vocal cords. They are the vowels a, e, i, o, u. The other sounds are consonants produced by air pressure: s, f, g, and so forth. Do you believe some combination of such basic sounds could ever explain who you are, or the ultimate purpose of the universe, or even what a tree or stone is in its depth?

— Eckhart Tolle (via cosmofilius)

(Source: lazyyogi, via anexpertonpaddedcells)

There is always something, a remnant, which will never come out from your brain, but will remain there with you, and you alone, for ever and ever, and you will die, perhaps, without having imparted what may be the very essence of your idea to a single living soul.

— Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Idiot (via normalhumanparanoia)

(via testarda-io)

What matters is precisely this; the unspoken at the edge of the spoken.

Virginia Woolf, from a diary entry dated 21 July 1912

(via violentwavesofemotion)

(via thisyesthis)

Emotions, in my experience, aren’t covered by single words. I don’t believe in ‘sadness,’ ‘joy,’ or ‘regret.’ Maybe the best proof that the language is patriarchal is that it oversimplifies feeling. I’d like to have at my disposal complicated hybrid emotions, Germanic train-car constructions like, say, ‘the happiness that attends disaster.’ Or: ‘the disappointment of sleeping with one’s fantasy.’ I’d like to have a word for ‘the sadness inspired by failing restaurants’ as well as for ‘the excitement of getting a room with a minibar.’ I’ve never had the right words to describe my life.

— Jeffery Eugenides (via heteroglossia)

(Source: lynnebj, via sheonlysaid)

Saying nothing sometimes says the most.

— Emily Dickinson (via amandaonwriting)

(via elvesandgnomes)

My thoughts are stars I can’t fathom into constellations.

John Green (via seabois)

(via retrojapan)

(Source: 100andsome, via virtuteleonis)

Creation seems to come out of imperfection. It seems to come out of a striving and a frustration. This is where, I think, language came from. I mean, it came from our desire to transcend our isolation and have some sort of connection with one another. It had to be easy when it was just simple survival. “Water.” We came up with a sound for that. “Sabretooth tiger behind you!” We came up with a sound for that. But when it gets really interesting, I think is when we use that same system of symbols to communicate all the abstract and intangible things that we’re experiencing. What is “frustration”? Or what is “anger” or “love”? When I say “love” the sound comes out of my mouth and it hits the other person’s ear, travels through this byzantine conduit in their brain through their memories of love or lack of love. And they register what I’m saying and they say yes they understand, but how do I know? Because words are inert. They’re just symbols. They’re dead. You know? And so much of our experience is intangible. So much of what we perceive cannot be expressed. It’s unspeakable. And yet, you know, when we communicate with one another and we feel that we have connected and we think we’re understood I think we have a feeling of almost spiritual communion. And that feeling may be transient, but I think it’s what we live for.

Richard Linklater, Waking Life (2001)

(Source: artistic-deviance, via locationandmovement-deactivated)

This photograph reminds me of a very similar drawing that I reblogged about two weeks ago right here.

This photograph reminds me of a very similar drawing that I reblogged about two weeks ago right here.

(Source: sydneygotswaggggggg, via lies-cause-love)

loveincolororg:

This. This. This. This. This. This. This. This. 

I hope that “gay” does not end up with the same result as the words “lame” and “dumb”. If what I gather is correct, the latter two originally meant “not able to walk” and “deaf”. Now the latter two are pejoratives.

loveincolororg:

This. This. This. This. This. This. This. This. 

I hope that “gay” does not end up with the same result as the words “lame” and “dumb”. If what I gather is correct, the latter two originally meant “not able to walk” and “deaf”. Now the latter two are pejoratives.

(via anomalouswanderer)

This is probably mainly American based since I know in some countries that any hand gesture is the equivalent of giving someone the bird, but this is great. I like this image.

This is probably mainly American based since I know in some countries that any hand gesture is the equivalent of giving someone the bird, but this is great. I like this image.

(Source: lianabakbakbak, via lies-cause-love)

Most of the time, because of their failure to fasten on to words, my thoughts remain misty and nebulous. They assume vague, amusing shapes and are then swallowed up: I promptly forget them.

— Jean-Paul Sartre (via anglicansaint)

(via iprefereccentric)